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It Doesn't Look Like a Monster

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It Doesn't Look Like a Monster

It Doesn't Look Like a Monster: A Visit to Fenway Park is a story told from the voice of a seven year old child, Sierra, who has CP and visits Fenway Park in Boston. The book focuses on Sierra's experiences at Fenway Park and only mentions her disability when it impacts how she participates in the tour of the ballpark.

Prior to arriving at Fenway Park, Sierra expresses her concern about the Green Monster, the large, green wall in right field, which serves as symbol of Fenway Park. She feels scared and apprehensive about the idea of a monster and frequently reflects her concerns during the tour of the ballpark.

Sierra has the opportunity to see the Red Sox hall of Fame, numerous views of the field from both above the field and at field level, the Green Monster, and the souvenir store.

By the end of the story, Sierra has had the opportunity to sit on top of the Green Monster and is proud that she is no longer scared. The story draws a parallel between the Green Monster and Sierra's cerebral palsy; both sound scary at first, but asking questions and experiencing them helps to make them less frightening.

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